MPUSD eNewsletter: September Stories » Measure I: Thank You Voters

Measure I: Thank You Voters

 
The Monterey Peninsula Unified School District ended last school year on a high note with the passage of Measure I, the $213 million school facilities bond, which allows the district to provide critical repairs for 21st century classrooms.
 
MPUSD sincerely thanks the community for supporting Measure I, and for its continued confidence in the district, its school, teachers and staff to prepare students for academic success.
 
The school facilities bond passed on June 5, 2018, by an overwhelming 70% to provide critical repairs to support modern learning in our schools. The district's "newest" schools (Foothill Elementary in Monterey and Marshall Elementary in Seaside) were built in 1965, and every campus is badly in need of repair. All schools have cases of failing plumbing, leaky roofs, and are in need of sewer and electrical updates. Some classrooms and school facilities have been updated to address these needs, but there is more work to be done.
 
Repairs are needed to help ensure that all students have equal access to a safe and modern learning environment. For example, science, technology, engineering, arts and math education are becoming increasingly critical in preparing students for today’s competitive job market. Yet most classrooms only have one or two electrical outlets, not nearly enough to support the learning technology our kids need to excel now and in the future. Funding from this bond will now provide dedicated resources to help our schools meet the rapidly changing requirements for student success in the 21st century.

Specifically, revenue from this bond will provide up-to-date science, technology, engineering, arts, athletic and math classrooms and school facilities to keep pace with learning needs, including:
 
  • Fixing and replacing leaky roofs
  • Replacing aging plumbing, gas, sewer and electrical systems, some of which are over 50 years old
  • Updating classrooms for career technical education and workforce training programs
  • Making essential safety and security updates

The cost to the average property owner is approximately $60 per $100,000 of assessed value (not market value) annually for as long as the bonds are outstanding. For the average homeowner, this measure costs about $180 per year.
 
A Citizen's Oversight Committee has been formed to oversee the expenditure of Measure I funds and implementation of projects. The COC will work in partnership with stakeholders, the Board of Education, and staff to identify and prioritize projects. The Board of Education meets the second and fourth Thursdays each month at 6:30. For more information, click here. For more information on the Citizen's Oversight Committee, click here.